Taking Orthostatic Blood Pressures

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This weeks Monday Minutes episode focuses on the procedure for taking orthostatic blood pressures. Now it may seem pretty straight forward for many but I have seen too many EMS providers do it wrong or for the wrong reasons. Take a look and let me know your thoughts on this skill.



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Talking About EMS Call Reports, Refusals and Ebola

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ambulance1MMThis weeks episode discusses EMS call reports, omitting details, refusals and CYA. Jim, Josh and Dave also divulge the number of Ebola patients they have come in contact with and Jim was surprised that Dave had 5X as many as Josh. Take a listen and leave your EMS call report thoughts below.

Be sure to FaceBook Like and Share below to spread the social media vibes.

 

 

 

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EMS Documentation Pearls | Part Two

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This episode on EMS Documentation is part two and goes a little more into detail when thinking about what and how to properly document your patient care as a paramedic.

 


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Claim your copy of Turbo Medic Highlights Volume One – click here

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Why Does EMS Have Such A High Turnover?

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EMS1  Is EMS the stepping stone to other professions? Do providers leave EMS to pursue better career options when they find so few in EMS. Sometimes its not about pay. Its can be about career movement, job satisfaction and options for the long haul. Are teaching and supervisory positions the only rungs in the ladder?

This week we had two guests join us from the EMS Flight and RN fields and the discussion went to everything from education and pay to what may be most important of all – action.

Take a listen and let your thoughts on this topic below.

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EMS Documentation Pearls | Part One

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This weeks episode is part one of two talking about some keys to EMS documentation. This often glossed over topic is also one of the most important aspects of your day to day EMS activities.

 

 

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Event Motivated Training | Frequent Flyers In The ICU

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AUDIO4For this second part of the live show we talk about how training motivated by events like 9/11 slowly fade into the background. Dave also talks about the frequent flyer and non emergency 911 calls we get that were shown in one private study to be admitted to the ICU 25% of the time.

Take a listen and be sure to share this episode and leave your comments below.

 

 

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Finally a way to get over any hurdle you have in your studies, help you with your career and professional growth

Click here to watch the video for details.

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Is The 9/11 Memorial Too Commercial?

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911MWith the anniversary of 9/11 tomorrow. Hosts Jim, Dave and Josh had a bit of a discussion about the Memorial itself. Mainly how many feel it is designed to earn revenue more than anything else. That can be hard to argue with the high price of entry, t-shirt sales and offerings of statue of liberty miniatures and jewerly designs.

Have you been to the Memorial? What do you think? Is it too costly and does the sale of tourist items lessen the meaning of this place of remembrance?

Click here for Jims article on the Ultimate Sacrifice

You can see the 9/11 Memorial website here.

 

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EMS Patient Assessment | Pulses and…

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This episode focuses on a common element in EMS patient assessment. Giving a patients heart rate is great but do we consistently describe a patients pulse quality so that every healthcare professional understands what we mean?

This video will give you an easy and accepted method in pulse quality description.


Find this video helpful? Be sure to spread the social media vibes by Sharing or Liking below.

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Using Time To Guide EMS Patient Care

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goldenhouremsEarly in EMS education we are presented with the idea that “time” is a factor in much of what we do. Golden Hours, Platinum Ten Minutes, Time is Muscle etc.

While some of these can help us with our treatment and transport decisions, have you ever wondered or questioned if they are getting in the way of patient care?

As EMS providers we bring much of the Emergency Department to the patient. Even more so we are expected to provide certain levels of care to our patients prior to delivery to these ED’s.

I am sure that you have been questioned or made to feel like less of a provider when you don’t provide certain aspects of care. Even when it was due to trying to follow dictated “time” constraints that are expected and may have been in the patients better interest to transport rather than perform a skill prior to arrival at the ED.

So what do you think? Are these time markers valuable to us as providers or helpful?

Do we end up focusing too much on them and not on what is best for the patient?

Join David, Jim, Josh and caller Donald for this episode as we discuss this and other popular EMS topics.

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Visit Jim at EMSSEO.com

Check out Josh over at WANTYNU.com and be sure to look up his newest EMS Tool – The PALM.

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A Cool Thing About EMS

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wwpmainLike any job EMS has it’s negative aspects. Often we can get bogged down with them and forget why we became EMT’s or Paramedics and miss out on the cool stuff. The opportunities that can matter and leave us as individuals feeling like we have a pretty cool job after all.

Recently I had the opportunity to do a stand by for a Wounded Warrior Project Bike Ride.

If you know me you know that this is a foundation that I support and have in the past donated a percentage of sales to them. I never have had the chance though to be at an event in person and see first hand the amazing dedication of its members and the participation of the Wounded Warriors themselves.

We arrived at the staging area and I did not know this but the Project provides all the bicycles and tricycles and helmets. They provide the water and organizational support to have these events succeed.  So as I watched the staff unload the bikes, lining them up I grew emotional knowing what this was all for. I began to realize this was more than the commercials I have seen on TV.

Not that I wasn’t aware of the depth of this organization and the importance of what they provide for our wounded veterans. I think it was more of seeing it first hand and perhaps knowing it was so much bigger than me and my simple donation.

As we began the riding route, a few bikes had issues. The WWP also had staff  to troubleshoot and fix any issues with the bikes along the way. This was a short 13 mile ride and included one short break midway. During this break I knew my role was to support them in a medical role. My partner would go around to see if the participants needed anything from us during the break and to let them we were there should they require us. There was one rider who fell early in the ride but got back on his bike and continued on.

In all there were about 35-40 participants and staff and the pace was set to the slowest rider, never leaving any one rider behind too far. It wasn’t a race. It was a ride to support the Wounded Warriors and the WWP.

The entire event lasted about 4 hours. Not long. But long enough to for me to realize that I get to do some pretty cool stuff in EMS.

I have been on Third Watch, meet actors, singers and athletes.

The honor I felt being a part of this Wounded Warrior Project Bike Ride was beyond anything I can think of in recent years. I suppose as a veteran myself I feel a connection to these warriors. While I can never compare what they have gone through or what they continue to struggle with. I still feel they are my brothers and sisters.

It is experiences like this that make me proud to be in EMS. That drive me forward to look beyond the negatives and focus on the positives.

Maybe we can’t all be a part of events like this. To sit back and say “What a cool job I have”.

Yet I have to disagree in that each day we have opportunities to say just that. The newborn we delivered, the STEMI we alerted, the CVA we recognized or even the hypoglycemic patients we treated. To me these are all pretty cool things we are a part of and do everyday.

I think by recognizing that we are professionals, that what we do for our patients and their families really can matter. We can say “What a cool job I have”.

We can feel honored in being in a position to help others when no one else can. It’s an honor that I think we all overlook sometimes. It’s an honor and privilege to be allowed into peoples homes everyday when they are at their worst. We must recognize this and treat it that way.

I hope you as my reader recognizes this. If not, my hope is that you get to do something cool like I have mentioned in this post. Something that makes you take a step back and realize that being offered these opportunities truly is a cool part about EMS.

I have posted some pictures below from the stand by and I hope you will go check out the Wounded Warrior Project by clicking here.

Pictures

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